Hello world

You are accused of a crime. Who should decide your fate? A human judge or a computer algorithm? They are absolutely sure? They may hesitate? In either case, you should read the book by young mathematician and presenter Hannah Fry, which educates about algorithms with refreshing directness by talking about people.

Algorithms are increasingly shaping everyday life in consumerism, finance, medicine, policing, justice, democracy, and even art. They sort the world for us, opening up new options and taking decisions away from us – quickly, effectively, thoroughly. But they are doing so without asking, presenting us with new dilemmas. Most importantly, though: we tend to think of algorithms as a kind of authority. instead of questioning their power.

There is no dimension of our world in which they have not long since found their way in: Algorithms, those inconspicuous sequences of instructions that operate on the Internet anyway, but also in every computer program, are shaping everyday life in consumption, finance, medicine, policing, justice, democracy, and even art to a growing, frightening extent. They sort the world for us, open up new options and take decisions away from us – quickly, effectively, thoroughly. But they often do so without asking us, and they present us with new dilemmas that are by no means easy to solve. Most importantly: we tend to think of algorithms as a kind of authority, rather than questioning their power. This opens the door to people who want to exploit us. But it also prevents us from getting better algorithms. Those that help us make decisions rather than dispose of us. Who reveal how they arrive at a particular decision. Democratic human algorithms. That’s what this book argues for – accessible, entertaining, highly informative.

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Published on 14. March 2019

272 S., with 9 illustrations

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beck-shop.de is the online store of the media group C.H.Beck.

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Buy books online with a good feeling!
Supporting your favorite bookstore with every order.
Read more about yourbook.store

Note on the book title
Introduction

Press reviews

"This book proves why good science writers are so important."
Katy Guest, The Guardian

"Cleverly, pointedly and wittily written. A perfect guide to living in the age of social media, algorithms, and automation."
Adam Rutherford

"A smart book."
MIRROR, Ann-Kathrin Nezik

"A successful piece of enlightenment about a development that concerns everyone (…) those who have read this book will be better able to join in the discussion."

"Full of examples and therefore downright entertaining to read."
Deutschlandfunk Culture, Volkart Wildermuth

"Hannah Fry has the perspective (…) and conveys her knowledge without scientific conceit, understandable and highly exciting (…) She brings to light (…) many a curiosity and does not let herself be deprived of a humorous touch."
Galore, Marina Mucha

"Takes (…) the task of communicating a particularly abstract science to the larger public at once seriously and with humor."
Suddeutsche Zeitung, Eva Weber-Guskar

"A very good and up-to-date classification, which is as informative for the layman as for the internet-savvy reader."
Book Culture, Thomas Feibel

"It is the great merit of this book to point out impressively that it is not about the alternative man or machine, but about finding ways for the variant ‘man plus machine’."
Book review.at, Hans Durrer

"Easy to understand and not too technical."
ZEIT WISSEN, Niels Boeing

"An exciting book about how much technology is changing us and how much we want it to do so."
emotion

"Hannah Fry points out opportunities and risks in an unagitated tone and provides a first-rate overview for those who should know about this topic, that is: for all of us."
Brigitte

"Stimulates thought and presents meaningful demands."
Neue Zurcher Zeitung, Matthias Sander

"A relatively short but immensely substantial work"
Handelsblatt.com, Giersch, Thorsten

"The mathematician (describes) with vivid anecdotes how algorithms work and what their results can say."
Berlin Morning Post

"A definitely smarter book that one can only wish a wide distribution, as it concerns a topic that, although not so obvious, nevertheless affects almost everyone."
Mittelbayerische Newspaper

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Published on 14. March 2019

3. Edition , 2019

272 S., with 9 illustrations

What algorithms can do and how they are changing our lives

Further information about the book and the author can be found at Special

You are accused of a crime. Who should decide your fate? A human judge or a computer algorithm? You are absolutely certain? You may hesitate? In either case, you should read young mathematician and presenter Hannah Fry’s book, which educates about algorithms with refreshing directness by being about people.

Algorithms are increasingly shaping everyday life in consumerism, finance, medicine, police, justice, democracy and even art. They sort the world for us, open up new options, and take decisions away from us – quickly, effectively, thoroughly. But they do so without asking, presenting us with new dilemmas. Above all: we tend to regard algorithms as a kind of authority. instead of questioning their power.

There is no dimension of our world in which they have not long since found their way in: Algorithms, those inconspicuous sequences of instructions that operate on the Internet anyway, but also in every computer program, are shaping everyday life in consumption, finance, medicine, police, justice, democracy and even art to a growing, frightening extent. They sort the world for us, open up new options and take decisions away from us – quickly, effectively, thoroughly. But they often do so without asking us, and they present us with new dilemmas that are by no means easy to resolve. Above all: we tend to regard algorithms as a kind of authority instead of questioning their power. This opens the door to people who want to exploit us. But it also prevents us from getting better algorithms. Those that help us make decisions rather than dispose of us. Which reveal how they arrive at a particular decision. Democratic, human algorithms. That’s what this book pleads for – accessible, entertaining, highly informative.

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