How to build a pinhole camera

Activities for grades 1 to 6

School program

Based on the framework curriculum of the elementary school in Brandenburg/Berlin for the areas of science, environment and natural sciences, we have developed a total of 20 experiment courses of 45 minutes each. With this, we would like to support the schools in achieving the educational goals.

Titles and notes on the content of our experiment courses can be found further down this page. In addition to the respective experimentation course, you and your children will explore the science exhibition with its ca. 80 interactive exhibits.

School groups should always register their visit in advance.

School classes from Potsdam pay 5 € per person (minimum price 50 €)

Teachers visit us at the Extavium free of charge.

TO BOOK

At the moment, visits to the Extavium are always exclusive: there are no other guests in the exhibition besides your group. In 2-hour time slots you can explore the interactive exhibition undisturbed. An Extavium tutor is available throughout the visit and will work with you on the "Mouse Maze" exhibition experiments and "Chocolate Kiss in a Vacuum conduct and, if interested, instruct further experiments and answer all questions on the topics of the exhibition. This package includes a 45-minute experiment course on exciting scientific phenomena. From our course program listed below you can choose the workshop that suits you best.

Schools/After-school programs/KiGa (exclusive use of the Extavium)
2h time slot incl. experimental course (Tue-Thu in the period 9:00-14:00)

Minimum price 200 €
Per 10 children one free
adult companion

Our recommendation: For an undisturbed visit, we recommend that you collect the students’ money beforehand and only allow one person to pay at the cash desk.

Online registration

Here you can find answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ).

Extavium is oriented towards school curricula!

+++ 20 courses from BIOLOGY, chemistry, mathematics, physics and technology +++ 45-minute experiments +++ pre- and post-experiment materials +++ interactive exhibition +++

To give you an example of an experiment course sequence and the associated follow-up ideas, the topic is "Colorful Kitchen Chemistry to be viewed in detail.

Our school courses
and course recommendations with reference to the topics of the
RLP Sachunterricht Jgst. 1-4 and RLP Natural Sciences Jgst. 5-6

Red cabbage, goo and bionics

Chemistry and physics in everyday life

Colorful kitchen chemistry | Plant dyes as indicators

The juice of red cabbage shows by color changes how acidic or soapy a powder or solution is.
In free experiments, children discover that liquids are stacked and why carbon dioxide bubbles can form.
The children learn that indicator plants tell us a lot about the nature of the soil they grow in and learn why red cabbage is also sometimes called blue cabbage.

Bionics – ideas of nature | Bionic products from everyday life – who knows them?

The battery, the salt shaker, the golf ball, and other examples where nature has found excellent solutions over time are pointed out.
The children learn why the polar bear does not freeze and what this has to do with modern telephone lines.
Antarctic penguins have a spherical body shape to avoid freezing. Using soap bubbles and soap skins, the children discover how we humans can cover large areas by discovering such minimal surfaces in architecture.

COURSE 3 ( 3.6 )

Slimy production | The secret of thickening and cross-linking

A special flour obtained from seeds of a tree growing in the Mediterranean region is used as a thickener: carob bean gum.
The children learn the secret of how to follow a recipe exactly. Besides water and food coloring, a good goo needs a crosslinking agent. A suitable substance – the salt of boric acid – is added in small doses, and after vigorous stirring, you can hear, see and feel whether the slimy is properly slippery.
The children can take the happy results home with them.

COURSE 4 ( 3.1 , 3.2 )

Colorful are the forests in autumn | Dyes and color separation – Sherlock Holmes sends his regards!

It is well known that colors can be mixed – but can mixed colors be separated again?? Since its discovery, no biochemical or crime lab can be imagined without the chromatography process.
In our felt-tip pens, only the primary colors are not mixed colors; all other felt-tip pen colors can be separated into their color components. Even the black shows that there is pink or light blue in it.
In the experiment, the children realize that the bright colors of autumn are already hidden in the green leaves of the plants in summer, which we clearly show by clever mortaring with the help of some tricks.

In the land of numbers

Mathematics in everyday life

COURSE 5 ( 3.1 , 3.4 )

The secrets of our planetary system | Incredible distances and fascinating ratios

Who knows the planets of our solar system and even in the correct order? There are some interesting details and amazing peculiarities in our planetary system, which are named: Why on Venus a day lasts longer than a year? Why we need Jupiter to survive? Why Pluto has not been allowed to be a planet for some time now?
The children pose as Mercury, Venus and Co – at a distance to scale: The dimensions of the universe become visible. We look through an astronomical telescope and consider why everything is seen upside down there.

Mathematical magic with a piece of paper | Ants in an endless loop – Mobius tapes and their application

A simple sheet of paper always has two sides. Folding a paper ring from a strip does not change anything. A clever twisting, however, results in an interesting mathematical body with only one side left: the Mobius strip. We show where this is used everywhere in real life.
The children discover that unimaginable shapes are created when you try to cut a Mobius strip.
Finally, each child climbs through a postcard – thanks to a clever paper cutout.

How many stars do we see in the sky? | Estimating or counting – the clever use of large numbers

How does a beekeeper know how many bees she has?? How to count the fish in a school? How many drops of water are in a bottle? – There are methods of skillful estimation, which bring one quite close to the truth.
We investigate the law of large numbers and learn that it often makes more sense to ask many people than just one expert – the many are often very right on average!
Children try their hand at estimating numbers, masses, and distances, and realize that this doesn’t come easily right away.

How many corners does a soccer ball have?? | Platonic and Archimedean solids

A soccer ball is round? Wrong! On closer inspection it even has quite a few corners. How to see and count them, the children quickly realize for themselves.
Mathematically speaking, a classic soccer ball is an Archimedean body. The children are provided with pentagons and hexagons (which are the black and white areas of the soccer) to build a soccer themselves as a team. This can then also be taken away!
We show that these soccer structures exist at the tiny atomic level and are even used in architecture to construct special roof domes.

Water, air and weather

The world that surrounds us

COURSE 9 ( 3.6 , 3.6 )

How swimming and diving work | The secret of density

We explore the mystery of why ships weighing tons float, but a small, light stone sinks. First, boats are kneaded, which are then loaded with a crew. Whose boat carries the biggest load?? What role does air play?
Each child builds a little diver and discovers how submarines, fish, ammonites, and sperm whales manage to easily change their diving depths. They are all constantly playing with their density – in this course, we will explore how they do this.

COURSE 10 ( 3.1 , 3.6 , 3.1 )

Mr. Celsius sends his regards! | weather measuring instruments and homemade clouds

How can a pine cone help us to learn about air humidity? How to build an air pressure gauge, a rain gauge or a compass?
In small groups, the children build different measuring instruments and learn about the ideas behind each one. At the end, the class can take their collection of measuring instruments with them, for example, to do further research on them at school.
With the help of water and some matches, we make cloud formation visible at low pressure and clear skies at high pressure – in a juice bottle!

COURSE 11 ( 3.3 , 3.1 )

Can you make cold? | How does a refrigerator work without electricity?

Even the ancient Romans had a craving for cooling ice cream in the warm summer months. But the electric-powered freezer we know today did not yet exist. What to do?
The children make a cold mixture and produce their own delicious ice cream.
In addition, the children learn how the Celsius temperature scale that we use today and the Fahrenheit scale used in the U.S. came about.

COURSE 12 ( 3.1 , 3.3 )

Our climate | Carbon dioxide – necessary and harmful at the same time?

Our climate is changing. The special thing about this is that this is happening much faster than ever before in the history of the earth and that humans have made a significant contribution to this change. Our energy production results in high carbon dioxide emissions. And this CO2 is partly to blame for heating up our atmosphere.
In several small experiments, the children explore how CO2 can be produced, what it sounds like, whether it smells and whether it is lighter or heavier than our air. We build a CO2 fire extinguisher and use a red cabbage to detect the amount of CO2 in the air we breathe.

Sunny times

Energy, electricity and work

COURSE 13 ( 3.2 , 3.1 )

How does sunlight taste? | Our tastes and what they mean

Basic tastes have evolved over the course of evolution and all have important meanings for us. We explore where exactly on our tongue we taste particularly good.
Children make their individual tongue cards and learn why hot is not one of the tastes.
In the end, it becomes clear to the children in an understandable way that sunlight has a (very pleasant) taste, so to speak!

COURSE 14 ( 3.3 , 3.9 )

Solar cells | Dye solar cells and how they work

The use of solar energy will play an increasingly important role in the future. The generation of electric power by means of solar cells is in particular the only way to convert sunlight into electricity without detours.
The children build solar cells from window glass, a white pigment, the dye from fruit tea, a metal a hundred times thinner than a human hair, graphite, and an electrically conductive liquid. You will learn how to measure their current and voltage and whether it would be conceivable to cover all our electricity needs via photovoltaics.
And: without solar cells there would be no Internet, no smartphones, no GPS, no weather report. Why? We will clarify this in the course!

The force with two sides | Magnetism in nature and technology

In our everyday life magnets play a very important role. In every radio, in the washing machine, in the bicycle dynamo … Hundreds of magnets, often invisible, are used unconsciously by all of us. Is magnetism an invention of humans?
Many animals can sense magnetism and orient themselves to the Earth’s magnetic field. We humans don’t have magnetic sense, but we can use a compass to help us find our way around. In the course, each child builds a swimming compass as it was used about 1 year ago.The first pinhole camera was used by European seafarers over the last 000 years.
Possibilities are shown how to orient oneself in nature without a compass and how to determine the points of the compass.

Inseparably connected! | electricity + magnetism = electromagnetism

When did people first experience the phenomenon of electricity?? Since when have we understood how to create and use them?
First as in 19. In the 19th century, when it was recognized that magnetism and electricity are two sides of the same coin and occur together, electric current could be generated and transported.
In the course, each child builds a small electric motor – something that rotates due to the presence of electricity and magnetism. Only 5 parts, which moreover everyone knows, need to be assembled to do this. But how?
A fascinating application is the eddy current brake. With its help, an ICE is brought to a halt – completely contact-free braking, completely silent. What we investigate!

Colorful world of light colors

Eye and vision

COURSE 17 ( 3.2 , 3.1 )

How does vision work? | Our eye and how we perceive colors

How many colors does the human eye see?? What are the basic colors of light and what other colors of light can be produced with them?? Why we can watch movies?
The human eye has 3 different broadband receptors for daytime vision. From their input, color sensations are triggered in the brain. Our eye is not able to see tiny things, and our image processing is relatively slow. But that’s exactly why we can watch movies. A bee, an eagle or an iguana would have no joy in the cinema. Why – we will clarify this in the course.
We also discuss why we actually see the whole world upside down and why our brain turns it around for us.

COURSE 18 ( 3.2 , 3.4 )

A pinhole camera to build yourself | Discover the camera obscura

Every camera, regardless of era, is a pinhole camera in its basic principle. Also our eye works like a pinhole camera, because our pupil is the hole through which light comes in.
Each child builds his or her own pinhole camera and discovers how to influence image sharpness and brightness. Besides explore the light color mixture.
The children discover that in every camera, including our eyes, the image is initially upside down and reversed.

COURSE 19 ( 3.2 )

How does spatial vision work? | The secret of human eyes

Humans can see three dimensions. Can animals do that too?? If so, all animals or only some?
We clarify which animals can see 3D and why. And which animals cannot and why not. The kids will experience what it looks like to have your eyes sideways in your head and each eye seeing something different.
We investigate whether you can also look 3D with only one eye. The ability to look spatially ceases after 10 meters at the latest. How do we nevertheless know what is further ahead and what is further behind in the case of objects that are far away??

COURSE 20 ( 3.2 , 3.3 )

How television works? | How pictures become a film

To create the shortest animated film in the world, you only need two pictures. In their self-produced film, the children recognize a decisive function of our eyes and our image processing in the brain: If we could process images as quickly as insects, there would be no cinema and no television. The inertia of our image processing, however, makes it possible to see moving images as a coherent movie.
Because we cannot see very sharply, every television screen has only three pixel colors. We learn about these three basic colors of light, mix and unmix them, and explain why we can see three colors at all and how animals see their world – and how animals would experience cinema and television.

PDF downloads

Elementary school program

Elementary School Program

Elementary school flyer

Elementary school flyer

Educational goals

Concept&Educational goals

Here’s what your visit to the Extavium will look like:

(outside the corona crisis)

Use our booking system to register for a visit as part of the school program. Please enter an alternative to your desired date in the comment field. The visit duration is usually 2 time hours.

Your registration will be confirmed by e-mail. You will receive a link to the additional materials of the respective course (worksheets, recommendations as well as further information), which you are welcome to use to prepare or follow up your visit in class.

On the day of the visit, you and your students will be personally welcomed by one of our staff members and given an introduction to our hands-on exhibition. You can find out exactly when the school program course will take place at our ticket office.

During your visit, you and the students will explore the exhibition freely and playfully. For some of the exhibits there is help from our staff, who are always available for further questions.

After two hours of research and discovery, we say goodbye to you and your group. We look forward to welcoming you back soon. Because learning in the Extavium is really fun!

Our tip: In addition to a visit to the Extavium, we recommend a trip to the Planetarium.

Questions and answers

Offers for grades 1 to 6

School Program

Based on the framework curriculum for elementary school in Brandenburg/Berlin for the areas of science, environment and natural sciences, we have developed a total of 20 experiment courses of 45 minutes each. With this we would like to support the schools in reaching the educational goals.

Titles and notes on the content of our experimental courses can be found further down on this page. In addition to the respective experimentation course, you and your children will explore the natural science exhibition during your stay at the Extavium with its approx. 80 interactive exhibits.

School groups should always register their visit in advance.

School classes from Potsdam pay 5 € per person (minimum price 50 €)

Teachers visit the Extavium free of charge.

TO BOOK

Currently, visits to the Extavium are always an exclusive use: there are no other guests in the exhibition besides your group. In 2-hour time slots you can explore the interactive exhibition undisturbed. An Extavium tutor is available during the entire visit and will work with you on the exhibition experiments "Mouse Maze" and "Chocolate kiss in a vacuum and, if interested, will conduct further experiments and answer all questions on the topics of the exhibition. Included in this package is a 45-minute experimentation course on exciting scientific phenomena. You can choose a suitable workshop from our course program listed below.

Schools/kindergartens/daycare centers (exclusive use of the extavium)
2h time slot incl. Experimental course (Tue-Thurs 9:00-14:00)

Minimum price 200 €
Per 10 children one free
adult companion

Our recommendation: For an undisturbed visit we recommend to collect the money from the students beforehand and to let only one person pay at the cash desk.

Online registration

Find answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ) here.

Extavium is based on school framework curricula!

+++ 20 courses from BIOLOGY, chemistry, mathematics, physics and technology +++ 45 minute experiments +++ Preparation and follow-up materials +++ Interactive exhibition +++

To give you an example of an experimental course sequence and the corresponding follow-up ideas, the topic is "Colorful kitchen chemistry to see in detail.

Our school courses
and course recommendations with reference to the topics of the
RLP Physical Education. 1-4 and RLP Natural Sciences Jgst. 5-6

Red cabbage, goo and bionics

Chemistry and physics in everyday life

Colorful kitchen chemistry | Plant dyes as indicators

The juice of red cabbage shows through color changes how acidic or soapy a powder or solution is.
Through free experimentation, children discover that liquids are stacked and why carbon dioxide bubbles can form.
The children learn that indicator plants tell us a lot about the nature of the soil in which they grow and learn why red cabbage is also sometimes called blue cabbage.

Bionics – ideas from nature | Bionic products from everyday life – who knows them??

The battery, the salt shaker, the golf ball and other examples where nature has found excellent solutions in the course of time will be shown.
The children learn why the polar bear does not freeze and what this has to do with modern telephone lines.
Antarctic penguins have a spherical body shape to avoid freezing. Using soap bubbles and soap skins, the children discover how we humans can cover large areas by discovering such minimal surfaces in architecture.

COURSE 3 ( 3.6 )

Slimy production | The secret of thickening and crosslinking

A special flour obtained from the seeds of a tree growing in the Mediterranean region is used as a thickening agent: carob bean gum.
The children learn the secret of following a recipe exactly. Besides water and food coloring, a good goo needs a crosslinking agent. A suitable substance – the salt of boric acid – is added in small doses, and after vigorous stirring you can hear, see and feel whether the slimy is properly slippery.
The children can take the happy result home with them.

COURSE 4 ( 3.1 , 3.2 )

Colorful are the woods in autumn | Dyes and color separation – Sherlock Holmes sends his regards!

It is well known that colors can be mixed – but can mixed colors be separated again?? Since its discovery, no biochemical or crime lab can be imagined without it: the process of chromatography.
In our felt pens are only the basic colors no mixed colors, all other felt pen colors can be separated into their color components. Even the black shows that there is pink or light blue in it.
In the experiment, the children realize that the bright colors of autumn are already hidden in the green leaves of the plants in summer, which we clearly show by clever mortaring with the help of some tricks.

In the land of numbers

Mathematics in everyday life

COURSE 5 ( 3.1 , 3.4 )

The secrets of our planetary system | Incredible distances and fascinating ratios

Who knows the planets of our solar system and that even in the correct order? There are some interesting details and amazing peculiarities in our planetary system, which are named: Why on Venus a day lasts longer than a year? Why do we need Jupiter to survive? Why Pluto has not been allowed to be a planet for some time now?
The children pose as Mercury, Venus and Co – at a distance true to scale: the dimensions of the universe become visible. We look through an astronomical telescope and think about why you see everything upside down there.

Mathematical magic with a sheet of paper | Ants in the infinite loop – Mobius tapes and their application

A simple sheet of paper always has two sides. Folding a paper ring from a strip does not change anything. A clever twisting, however, results in an interesting mathematical body with only one side left: the Mobius strip. We show where this is used everywhere in real life.
The children discover that unimaginable shapes are formed when you try to cut a Mobius strip.
Finally, each child climbs through a postcard – thanks to a clever silhouette.

How many stars do we see in the sky? | Estimating or counting – the clever use of large numbers

How does a beekeeper know how many bees she has?? How to count the fish in a school? How many drops of water are in a bottle? – There are methods of skillful estimation that allow you to get quite close to the truth.
We investigate the law of large numbers and learn that it often makes more sense to ask many people than just one expert – the many are often very right on average!
The children try their hand at estimating numbers, masses and distances and realize that this is not immediately easy.

How many corners does a soccer ball have?? | Platonic and Archimedean solids

A soccer ball is round? Wrong! At a closer look it has even quite a lot of corners. The children quickly realize for themselves how to see and count them.
Mathematically seen, a classical soccer is an Archimedean body. The children are provided with pentagons and hexagons (these are the black and white surfaces of the soccer ball) to build a soccer ball themselves as a team. This can then also be taken away!
We show that these soccer ball structures exist on a tiny atomic level and are even used in architecture to construct special roof domes.

Water, air and weather

The world that surrounds us

COURSE 9 ( 3.6 , 3.6 )

How swimming and diving work | The secret of density

We explore the mystery of why ships weighing tons float, but a small, light stone sinks. First, boats are kneaded, which are then loaded with a crew. Whose boat carries the biggest load? What role does air play in this??
Each child builds a little diver and discovers how submarines, fish, ammonites and sperm whales manage to easily change their diving depths. They are all constantly playing with their density – we will explore how they do this in the course.

COURSE 10 ( 3.1 , 3.6 , 3.1 )

Mr. Celsius sends his regards! | Weather measuring instruments and homemade clouds

How can a pine cone help them learn about humidity?? How to build an air pressure gauge, a rain gauge or a compass?
In small groups, the children build different measuring devices and find out what the idea behind each of them is. At the end, the class can take their collection of meters home to do more research on them, for example, at school.
With the help of water and some matches we make the formation of clouds at low pressure and clear skies at high pressure visible – in a juice bottle!

COURSE 11 ( 3.3 , 3.1 )

Can you make cold? | How does a refrigerator work without electricity?

Even the ancient Romans had a craving for cooling ice cream in the warm summer months. But the electric-powered freezer as we know it today did not yet exist. What to do?
The children make a refrigerated mixture and produce their own delicious ice cream.
In addition, the children learn how the Celsius temperature scale used in our country today and the Fahrenheit scale used in the United States came about.

COURSE 12 ( 3.1 , 3.3 )

Our climate | Carbon dioxide – necessary and harmful at the same time?

Our climate is changing. What is unique about this is that it is happening much faster than at any time in Earth’s history and that humans are a major contributor to this change. Our energy production results in high carbon dioxide emissions. And this CO2 is partly to blame for the fact that our atmosphere is heating up.
In several small experiments, the children explore how to make their own CO2, what it sounds like, whether it smells, and whether it is lighter or heavier than the air we breathe. We build a CO2 fire extinguisher and detect the CO2 content in the air we breathe with the help of a red cabbage.

Sunny times

Energy, electricity and work

COURSE 13 ( 3.2 , 3.1 )

How does the sunlight taste? | Our tastes and what they mean

The basic tastes have developed in the course of evolution and all have an important meaning for us. We explore where exactly on our tongue we taste particularly good.
The children make their individual tongue maps and learn why spicy is not one of the tastes.
In the end, it becomes clear to the children in an understandable way that sunlight has a (very pleasant) taste, so to speak!

COURSE 14 ( 3.3 , 3.9 )

Solar cells | Dye solar cells and how they work

The use of solar energy will play an increasingly important role in the future. The generation of electric current by means of solar cells is in particular the only possibility to transform sunlight into electricity without detours.
Children build solar cells using window glass, a white pigment, the dye from fruit tea, a metal hundreds of times thinner than a human hair, graphite, and an electrically conductive liquid. They learn how to measure their current and voltage and whether it would be conceivable to cover all our electricity needs through photovoltaics.
And: without solar cells, there would be no Internet, no smartphones, no GPS, no weather report. Why? This is what we clarify in the course!

The force with two sides | Magnetism in nature and technology

Magnets play a very important role in our everyday life. In every radio, in the washing machine, in the bicycle dynamo … Hundreds of magnets, often invisible, are used by each of us unconsciously. Is magnetism an invention of humans?
Many animals can sense magnetism and orient themselves to the earth’s magnetic field. We humans do not have a magnetic sense, but we can use a compass to orient ourselves. In the course each child builds a swimming compass as it was used about 1.000 years ago, solar energy was first used by European seafarers.
The possibilities of finding one’s way in nature without a compass and determining the points of the compass are demonstrated.

Inseparably connected! | Electricity + magnetism = electromagnetism

When did people first experience the phenomenon of electricity? Since when have we understood how to generate and use it?
First as in the 19. In the 19th century it was recognized that magnetism and electricity are two sides of the same coin and occur together, electric current could be generated and transported.
In the course, each child builds a small electric motor – that is, something that turns due to the presence of electricity and magnetism. Only 5 parts, which besides everybody knows, must be assembled for it. But how?
A fascinating application is the eddy current brake. With its help, an ICE train is brought to a halt – completely contactless braking, completely silent. This is what we investigate!

Colorful world of light colors

Eye and vision

COURSE 17 ( 3.2 , 3.1 )

How does vision work? | Our eye and how we perceive colors

How many colors does the human eye see?? What are the basic colors of light and what other colors of light can be created with them?? Why we can watch movies?
The human eye has 3 different broadband receptors for daytime vision. From their input, color sensations are triggered in the brain. Our eyes are not able to see tiny little things, and our image processing happens relatively slowly. This is exactly why we can watch movies. A bee, an eagle or an iguana would have no fun in the cinema. Why – we will clarify this in the course.
We will also discuss why we actually see the whole world upside down and why our brain turns it around for us.

COURSE 18 ( 3.2 , 3.4 )

A pinhole camera to build yourself | Discover the camera obscura

Every camera, no matter from which epoch, is a pinhole camera in its basic principle. Our eye also works like a pinhole camera, because our pupil is the hole through which light enters.
Each child builds his or her own pinhole camera and discovers how to influence the sharpness and brightness of the image. Along the way, explore the mixing of light colors.
The children discover that in every camera, including our eyes, the image is initially upside down and laterally reversed.

COURSE 19 ( 3.2 )

How does spatial vision work? | The mystery of the human eye

Humans can see three dimensions. Can animals do that too? If so, all animals or only some?
We clarify which animals can see 3D and why. And which animals can’t and why not. Children experience what it looks like to have your eyes sideways in your head and each eye sees something different.
We investigate whether it is possible to see 3D with only one eye. The ability to look spatially stops after 10 meters at the latest. How do we know what is in front and what is in back of distant objects??

COURSE 20 ( 3.2 , 3.3 )

How television works? | How pictures become a film

To create the shortest animated film in the world, you only need two pictures. The children recognize from their self-produced film a crucial function of our eyes, or rather of our image processing in the brain: If we could process images as quickly as insects, there would be no cinema and no television. The inertia of our image processing, however, makes it possible to see moving images as a coherent film.
In addition, because we cannot see very sharply, every television screen can manage with only three pixel colors. We will learn about these three basic colors of light, mix and unmix them, and explain why we can see three colors at all and how animals see their world – and how animals would experience cinema and television.

PDF downloads

Elementary School Program

Elementary school program

Flyer Elementary School

Flyer elementary school

Educational goals

Concept&Educational Objectives

And this is what your visit to the Extavium will look like:

(outside the corona crisis)

Use our booking system to register for a visit as part of the school program. Please enter an alternative to your desired date in the comments field. The duration of the visit is usually 2 time hours.

Your registration will be confirmed by e-mail. You will receive a link to the additional materials of the respective course (worksheets, recommendations as well as further information), which you are welcome to use to prepare or follow up your visit in the classroom.

On the day of the visit, you and your students will be personally greeted by one of our staff members and given an introduction to our hands-on exhibition. You can find out exactly when the course for the school program will take place at our box office.

During your visit, you and the students will explore the exhibition freely and playfully. For some of the exhibits, there is help from our staff* who are always happy to answer any further questions you may have.

After two hours of research and discovery, we will say goodbye to you and your group. We are looking forward to welcoming you again soon. Because learning in the Extavium is really fun!

Our tip: In addition to a visit to the Extavium, we recommend a trip to the Planetarium.

Questions and answers

1. Which courses are suitable for grades 1-2?

In principle, we can conduct all courses with any age group, as we always adapt explanations to the knowledge level of the participants. You are welcome to use your framework curriculum as a guideline. Our course description with the relevant topics per grade also provides assistance here. As an introduction to the world of experimentation, however, we recommend our slimy-making course (Course 3). Here the children have their first experiences with measuring, weighing, stirring and manage to get water so solid that they can hold it well in their hands.

2. Do I have to book a course?

A visit to the Extavium with a school class always includes a visit to the interactive exhibition and participation in an experimentation course, or a guided tour. School program course. In the exhibition, the children experience free experimentation and exploration. Of course, you will be accompanied by our pedagogical staff (if you wish). In the laboratory, research is conducted under supervision, so that the chosen topic is treated both verbally and experimentally, and is thus fundamentally understood.

3. How many children can I bring to the Extavium at the same time??

In principle, it is possible to have two school classes in the Extavium at the same time per time slot (i.e. two hours). If you want to come with more school classes, we stagger the visit. We are happy to recommend alternative possibilities where you can spend time in Potsdam with children who are not at the Extavium.
Please note that this offer is only possible if the day you wish to visit is not already occupied by other schools. We therefore recommend a timely (at least 5 weeks in advance) booking request on your part.

4. Do I as a teacher or. the parents must also pay as accompanying persons?

Teachers visit the Extavium free of charge. Parents as accompanying persons pay the normal entrance fee.

5. It is also possible to book two courses?

The booking of two experimentation courses or. School program courses are possible. In this case, we would adjust the visit time window and extend your stay.
However, since the impressions, experiences and knowledge gained in the Extavium are very great, we recommend that you participate in only one course and instead choose another program on another day of the visit.

6. Is there a guided tour of the exhibition?

Our concept of free exploration allows children to move completely freely and explore what interests them. The children themselves decide how long they want to spend at certain stations, how often they want to return, and with whom they want to explore individual exhibits. Of course, all children can be accompanied by our pedagogical staff.
Our visitors receive a kind of "guided tour" in the individual experimental courses in the laboratory.

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